‘Such a light’: Family pleads for patience after COVID-19 claims 33-year-old loved one

‘Such a light’: Family pleads for patience after COVID-19 claims 33-year-old loved one

Zack Starrett’s family will tell you he lived for the outdoors. An active, healthy, happy 33-year-old man who loved to travel and spend time with his longtime girlfriend, Michelle Rauenswinder, and their dog, Doug.Starrett died last week, nearly two months after he was diagnosed with COVID-19.”He is, and will continue to always be, such a light,” said Zack’s brother, Josh Starrett.Zack Starrett’s battle with COVID-19 started in early October, according to his family. There was some shortness of breath, followed by a string of painful migraines that ultimately led Zack Starrett to take himself to a nearby hospital. Within hours, Zack Starrett was flown to UPMC Presbyterian Hospital in Pittsburgh.”They diagnosed him with COVID-related double lung pneumonia and COVID-related heart failure,” Josh Starrett said.Zack Starrett fought for weeks as his organs continued to fail. “It was devastating,” Michelle Rauenswinder said. “It just slowly and progressively got worse. He was literally not able to catch his breath.”Josh Starrett said his brother loved to travel and play music. Zack Starrett taught himself how to play the mandolin. The family rented a hotel room in Pittsburgh to be closer to Zack Starrett as his battle with the virus took a turn over the last few weeks.Zack Starrett managed “Flappers,” the upstairs bar at Tin Lizzy in Youngstown, Westmoreland County. The business was ordered to close by the Pennsylvania Department of Agriculture this week for remaining open for dine-in eating, in violation of statewide orders. Buck Pawlosky declined an interview but told sister station WTAE that he has continued to keep his business open in violation of these orders to prevent it from closing permanently. Zack Starrett’s family acknowledges there is no way to know where he contracted the virus. Rauenswinder said Zack Starrett took extra precautions.”He wore his mask. He washed his hands,” Rauenswinder said. “We’d get into the truck and he would spray his hands. He did the right things.”The family’s goal now is to try to protect others by sharing Zack Starrett’s story. Hoping it may be a reminder to some about the devastating impact that can be made by this virus.”I just hope that people listen and people are paying attention because this is very real and it does not discriminate,” Josh Starrett said.”Our lives are forever changed and if we can save another family from this, it’s worth it,” Rauenswinder said.

READ MORE  Viewers' Choice 2021: Best gyms in New Hampshire

Zack Starrett’s family will tell you he lived for the outdoors. An active, healthy, happy 33-year-old man who loved to travel and spend time with his longtime girlfriend, Michelle Rauenswinder, and their dog, Doug.

Starrett died last week, nearly two months after he was diagnosed with COVID-19.

“He is, and will continue to always be, such a light,” said Zack’s brother, Josh Starrett.

Zack Starrett’s battle with COVID-19 started in early October, according to his family. There was some shortness of breath, followed by a string of painful migraines that ultimately led Zack Starrett to take himself to a nearby hospital. Within hours, Zack Starrett was flown to UPMC Presbyterian Hospital in Pittsburgh.

READ MORE  Myanmar locks down parts of Yangon amid virus increase

“They diagnosed him with COVID-related double lung pneumonia and COVID-related heart failure,” Josh Starrett said.

Zack Starrett fought for weeks as his organs continued to fail.

“It was devastating,” Michelle Rauenswinder said. “It just slowly and progressively got worse. He was literally not able to catch his breath.”

Josh Starrett said his brother loved to travel and play music. Zack Starrett taught himself how to play the mandolin. The family rented a hotel room in Pittsburgh to be closer to Zack Starrett as his battle with the virus took a turn over the last few weeks.

Zack Starrett managed “Flappers,” the upstairs bar at Tin Lizzy in Youngstown, Westmoreland County. The business was ordered to close by the Pennsylvania Department of Agriculture this week for remaining open for dine-in eating, in violation of statewide orders.

READ MORE  Does weather affect the spread of the coronavirus outside?

Buck Pawlosky declined an interview but told sister station WTAE that he has continued to keep his business open in violation of these orders to prevent it from closing permanently.

Zack Starrett’s family acknowledges there is no way to know where he contracted the virus. Rauenswinder said Zack Starrett took extra precautions.

“He wore his mask. He washed his hands,” Rauenswinder said. “We’d get into the truck and he would spray his hands. He did the right things.”

The family’s goal now is to try to protect others by sharing Zack Starrett’s story. Hoping it may be a reminder to some about the devastating impact that can be made by this virus.

“I just hope that people listen and people are paying attention because this is very real and it does not discriminate,” Josh Starrett said.

“Our lives are forever changed and if we can save another family from this, it’s worth it,” Rauenswinder said.

Source link

Be the first to comment

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.


*