Crews rescue horse, his new owner from deep swamp in Brookfield woods

Crews rescue horse, his new owner from deep swamp in Brookfield woods

Firefighters and other crews spent several hours in the woods Sunday night working to rescue a horse stuck in mud.>> Download the FREE WMUR appStetson, a 7-year-old rescue, had just arrived at his new farm six hours before he spooked and broke through a fence and got stuck in mud about a half-mile into the woods off Garney Road in Brookfield.Keaghan Pike, the horse’s new owner, tried to rescue him but found herself waist-high in mud before first responders arrived.“If you ran through the woods, which is what I did to find him, I followed his hoofprints and followed him to where he was. When I found him, he was already in the mud and I didn’t realize the swamp was as deep as it was,” Pike said.The sun was setting and temperatures were dropping into the teens. Pike had her phone but wasn’t exactly sure where she was. Wakefield firefighters responded first, but the rescue quickly became a mutual aid operation, including help from police, her farrier Beth Louis and her veterinarian.“It was inches. They were moving him inches by inches. It wasn’t feet by feet. It was inches by inches,” Pike said. Pike said she was grateful her farrier was there to direct the effort because she said none of the first responders had a lot of animal expertise.“There is so much to be emphasized on training and the proper equipment. You really can’t be using human equipment on a 1,000-pound animal,” Pike said. “These men were using brute force to get this horse out.” Stetson got credit, too, for being calm under pressure. He even ate some food throughout the eight-hour ordeal.“He remained calm when they needed him to be calm and when they needed him to use his own weight to get himself out, he used his own weight,” Pike said. “He’s a great little horse. I think he knows it, too. I think he knows he’s a star at this point.”Stetson was a gift to Pike from a Wolfeboro woman who set out to make a Christmas wish come true by using her Christmas bonus to pay it forward.“I am so thankful for the quick response of the firefighters, my vet, everybody. They did a remarkable job,” Pike said.

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Firefighters and other crews spent several hours in the woods Sunday night working to rescue a horse stuck in mud.

>> Download the FREE WMUR app

Stetson, a 7-year-old rescue, had just arrived at his new farm six hours before he spooked and broke through a fence and got stuck in mud about a half-mile into the woods off Garney Road in Brookfield.

Keaghan Pike, the horse’s new owner, tried to rescue him but found herself waist-high in mud before first responders arrived.

“If you ran through the woods, which is what I did to find him, I followed his hoofprints and followed him to where he was. When I found him, he was already in the mud and I didn’t realize the swamp was as deep as it was,” Pike said.

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The sun was setting and temperatures were dropping into the teens. Pike had her phone but wasn’t exactly sure where she was.

Wakefield firefighters responded first, but the rescue quickly became a mutual aid operation, including help from police, her farrier Beth Louis and her veterinarian.

“It was inches. They were moving him inches by inches. It wasn’t feet by feet. It was inches by inches,” Pike said.

Pike said she was grateful her farrier was there to direct the effort because she said none of the first responders had a lot of animal expertise.

“There is so much to be emphasized on training and the proper equipment. You really can’t be using human equipment on a 1,000-pound animal,” Pike said. “These men were using brute force to get this horse out.”

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Stetson got credit, too, for being calm under pressure. He even ate some food throughout the eight-hour ordeal.

“He remained calm when they needed him to be calm and when they needed him to use his own weight to get himself out, he used his own weight,” Pike said. “He’s a great little horse. I think he knows it, too. I think he knows he’s a star at this point.”

Stetson was a gift to Pike from a Wolfeboro woman who set out to make a Christmas wish come true by using her Christmas bonus to pay it forward.

“I am so thankful for the quick response of the firefighters, my vet, everybody. They did a remarkable job,” Pike said.

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